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The Great Mother Goddess, commonly referred to simply as the Goddess, is the female ruler of the gods. She is the sister of Mithros and the patron deity of women. She is also associated with crops, weaving, spinning, and the moon. She has three aspects: maiden, mother, and crone. These three aspects correspond to women's stages of life.

Other titles include Mother of Mountains, Mother of Mares, and Mother of Waters. A symbol used to represent the Goddess is the Ladymoon[1].

Appearance

In her "mother" aspect, the Goddess appears as a stunningly beautiful woman, with emerald eyes, dazzlingly white skin, black hair, and full red lips. According to Alanna, who is one of her chosen, her voice sounds like the baying of hounds and the call of the huntress urging them on. It can be painful for mortals to hear.

Worship

The Goddess is worshipped throughout the Eastern Lands. She has convents dedicated to her where young noblewomen may be sent to learn "womanly" arts such as embroidery. Her clergy is exclusively female. Temples of the Goddess are guarded by fierce warrior priestesses. These temples also serve as sanctuary for women fleeing from abusive men. They also have their own courts which can help women in need. Eleni Cooper, mother of George Cooper, was a priestess of the Goddess in her youth and Clara Goodwin is a magistrate for the Goddess in the Lower City of Corus[2]. The priestesses wear robes in white, brown or black[3].

Rituals

Marriages performed under the Goddess are much like the pagan ceremony of handfasting, which involves binding the hands of the couple together. A priestess of the Goddess, along with a priest of Mithros, performs Tortallan royal marriages.

On Beltane, which occurs in April in the Tortallan universe, couples jump over bonfires together and ask the Goddess to bless the crops for a good harvest.

When a girl has her first period she is brought to the local temple for blessing.[4]

Influences

The Goddess is based off of the threefold goddess motif that is common in many world cultures.

References

  1. Terrier, Glossary (p. 578)
  2. Terrier, April 2, 246 (p. 86)
  3. Terrier, April 7, 246 (p. 246)
  4. Terrier, April 2, 246 (p. 72)
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